See-Through Mice Reveal Details of Inner Anatomy

Researchers have found a way to make see-through mice, but you won’t find these critters scampering in your kitchen.

The transparent rodents aren’t alive and they’re for research only, to help scientists study fine details of anatomy.”

Read more from the Associated Press.

What the Heck Is a Pangolin?

Pangolins are being over-poached, a conservation group has warned, thanks to being “eaten to extinction" in China and Vietnam. An action plan issued Tuesday called for ending poaching, as well as increasing surveillance of trade and consumption of the endangered animals.

But before we move along, what are pangolins?”

Learn more about these unusual animals from theatlantic.

Dinosaurs ‘shrank’ regularly to become birds

Huge meat-eating, land-living dinosaurs evolved into birds by constantly shrinking for over 50 million years, scientists have revealed.

Theropods shrunk 12 times from 163kg (25st 9lb) to 0.8kg (1.8lb), before becoming modern birds.

The researchers found theropods were the only dinosaurs to get continuously smaller.

Their skeletons also changed four times faster than other dinosaurs, helping them to survive.

Results from the study are reported in the journal Science.”

Read more from the bbcnews.

Scientists Uncover a Surprising World of Microbes in Cheese Rind
“The rind of good cheese is a thriving microbial community. A single gram—a tiny crumb—contains 10 billion microbial cells, a mix of bacteria and fungi thatcontribute delicious and sometimes funky flavors. But even though humans have been making cheese for thousands of years, we know very little about what all those bugs are and how they interact.
Benjamin Wolfe and Rachel Dutton want to change that. The two scientists recently brought 137 cheeses from 10 countries into Dutton’s lab at Harvard University for genetic analysis. In a paper published July 17 in Cell, they and colleagues describe their findings, which include a few surprises—like the presence of bacteria commonly found in marine environments on cheeses made nowhere near an ocean.”
Learn more from wired.
Zoom Info
Camera
Canon EOS 60D
ISO
1600
Exposure
1/60th
Focal Length
50mm

Scientists Uncover a Surprising World of Microbes in Cheese Rind

The rind of good cheese is a thriving microbial community. A single gram—a tiny crumb—contains 10 billion microbial cells, a mix of bacteria and fungi thatcontribute delicious and sometimes funky flavors. But even though humans have been making cheese for thousands of years, we know very little about what all those bugs are and how they interact.

Benjamin Wolfe and Rachel Dutton want to change that. The two scientists recently brought 137 cheeses from 10 countries into Dutton’s lab at Harvard University for genetic analysis. In a paper published July 17 in Cell, they and colleagues describe their findings, which include a few surprises—like the presence of bacteria commonly found in marine environments on cheeses made nowhere near an ocean.”

Learn more from wired.

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