Beyond Pistorius: rise of ‘cyberathletes’ could change sport as we know it
“Sports engineer David James of the University of Sheffield Hallam sees the integration of technology in sport as inevitable, albeit disruptive.
"The issue is whether technology is enabling or enhancing," says James. "There is potentially so much technology that could be used, but even if an athlete is less responsible, competition could still be valid."
"Technology often defines sport — windsurfing came out of sailing, snowboarding came out of skiing. People were horrified by full-body swimsuits at first. What starts as an aberration becomes accepted and respected in its own right. Sports do change, evolve and die out all the time."
Read more from CNN.
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Beyond Pistorius: rise of ‘cyberathletes’ could change sport as we know it

Sports engineer David James of the University of Sheffield Hallam sees the integration of technology in sport as inevitable, albeit disruptive.

"The issue is whether technology is enabling or enhancing," says James. "There is potentially so much technology that could be used, but even if an athlete is less responsible, competition could still be valid."

"Technology often defines sport — windsurfing came out of sailing, snowboarding came out of skiing. People were horrified by full-body swimsuits at first. What starts as an aberration becomes accepted and respected in its own right. Sports do change, evolve and die out all the time."

Read more from CNN.

Chin strap makes electricity from chewing

Engineers in Canada have built a chin strap that harnesses energy from chewing and turns it into electricity.

They say the device could one day take the place of batteries in hearing aids, earpieces and other small gadgets.

Made from a “smart” material that becomes electrically charged when stretched, the prototype needs to be made 20 times more efficient in order to generate useful amounts of power.”

Learn more from bbcnews.

MIT’s Robot Cheetah Is No Longer Bound to the Treadmill

Two years ago, MIT researchers showcased the first run of its cheetah-inspired robot, which could run 5.1 miles per hour, but only on a treadmill.

Now, the team there has significantly improved the robot’s capabilities. It can run twice as fast (10 mph), jump over 13-inch obstacles, and is no longer tethered to the treadmill.”

Read more at mashable.

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