Flexible Printed Batteries May Soon Power Wearable Tech

A California startup is developing flexible, rechargeable batteries that can be printed cheaply on commonly used industrial screen printers. Imprint Energy, of Alameda, California, has been testing its ultra-thin zinc-polymer batteries in wrist-worn devices and hopes to sell them to manufacturers of wearable electronics, medical devices, smart labels and environmental sensors.

The company’s approach is meant to make the batteries safe for on-body applications, while their small size and flexibility will allow for product designs that would have been impossible with bulkier lithium-based batteries. Even in small formats, the batteries can deliver enough current for low-power wireless communications sensors, distinguishing them from other types of thin batteries.”

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This Is How You Make Selfie Toast

Toasting your selfie onto a piece of bread takes a lot more technology than you might think.

Vermont Novelty Toaster Corp. has been making image-burning toasters for four years. It specializes in sports logos and last year had a big hit with Jesus toast, but company President and CEO Galen Dively had long dreamed of making truly customized designs, including toast with peoples face on it. It was, until recently, an impractical dream.”

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Some Universities Crack Code in Drawing Women to Computer Science

One of the reasons so few women work in tech is that few choose to study computer science or engineering. Only 18 percent of computer science graduates in the United States are women, down from 37 percent in 1985.

At a few top college programs, though, that appears to be changing.

At Carnegie Mellon University, 40 percent of incoming freshmen to the School of Computer Science are women, the largest group ever. At the University of Washington, another technology powerhouse, women earned 30 percent of computer science degrees this year. At Harvey Mudd College, 40 percent of computer science majors are women, and this year, women represented more than half of the engineering graduates for the first time.”

Read more at the nytimes.

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