A House Made From Mushrooms? An Artist Dreams of a Fungal Future
“Why build a home if you can grow one? San Francisco-based artist Phil Ross has spent the last 20 years developing sustainable materials from mushrooms.
Although Ross originally cultivated mushrooms as food, he quickly became fascinated by their potential as an artistic medium. He started growing sculptures and other structural forms out of fungus. And through a process he calls “mycotecture,” Ross crafted furniture, interlocking blocks, and a small tea house.”
Learn more at QUEST.
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A House Made From Mushrooms? An Artist Dreams of a Fungal Future

Why build a home if you can grow one? San Francisco-based artist Phil Ross has spent the last 20 years developing sustainable materials from mushrooms.

Although Ross originally cultivated mushrooms as food, he quickly became fascinated by their potential as an artistic medium. He started growing sculptures and other structural forms out of fungus. And through a process he calls “mycotecture,” Ross crafted furniture, interlocking blocks, and a small tea house.”

Learn more at QUEST.

Is This the World’s First Building With a Bio-based Façade?

Dutch Studio Marco Vermeulen just unveiled what they call “the world’s first building with a bio-based facade" in the village of Dinteloord in the Netherlands. It was commissioned by The Horticultural Development Company, and it feature walls with embossed letters. These walls are made from a new biodegradable material called Nabasco 5010, which is a mix of bioresin and hemp fibers.”

See more images at inhabitat.

Watch this MIT Researcher Triple the Size of a 200-Foot Apartment Using ‘Minority Report’-Like Gestures

MIT Media Lab’s Changing Places team has created a futuristic device that could make your tiny apartment feel more like a spacious penthouse. Introducing CityHome, a motorized and compact “home in a box” that can make a 200 square foot space feel like a room three times larger. Equipped with built-in sensors, motors, and LED lights, this multipurpose invention will even expand and collapse with a wave of your hand or the sound of your voice.”

Learn more from Inhabitat.

China’s Forbidden City rocks were transported on ice

Huge stones that make up parts of China’s Forbidden City were transported along artificial ice paths lubricated with water, a team says.

That’s despite the fact that wheeled vehicles had been developed 3,000 years earlier.

The colossal city was built in the 15th Century by workers at the start of the Ming dynasty.

Writing in PNAS journal, the team says that wood-on-ice sliding was more reliable than using wheels.”

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